"Mozart's Music is so pure and beautiful that I see it as a reflection of the inner beauty of the universe itself."

Albert Einstein

Requiem in D minor, K.626 for Solo, Choir and string quartett, KV 626

Arranged by Peter Lichtenthal
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
1791
Length: 48'
I. Introitus
o Requiem aeternam
II. Kyrie
III. Sequentia
o Dies irae
o Tuba mirum
o Rex tremendae
o Recordare
o Confutatis
o Lacrimosa
IV. Offertorium
o Domine Jesu
o Hostias
V. Sanctus
VI. Benedictus
VII. Agnus Dei
VIII. Communio
o Lux aeterna

The Requiem in D minor, K. 626, is a requiem mass by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Mozart composed part of the Requiem in Vienna in late 1791, but it was unfinished at his death on 5 December the same year. A completed version dated 1792 by Franz Xaver Süssmayr was delivered to Count Franz von Walsegg, who commissioned the piece for a Requiem service to commemorate the anniversary of his wife's death on 14 February.

The autograph manuscript shows the finished and orchestrated Introit in Mozart's hand, and detailed drafts of the Kyrie and the sequence Dies irae as far as the first eight bars of the "Lacrimosa" movement, and the Offertory. It cannot be shown to what extent Süssmayr may have depended on now lost "scraps of paper" for the remainder; he later claimed the Sanctus and Agnus Dei as his own. Walsegg probably intended to pass the Requiem off as his own composition, as he is known to have done with other works. This plan was frustrated by a public benefit performance for Mozart's widow Constanze. She was responsible for a number of stories surrounding the composition of the work, including the claims that Mozart received the commission from a mysterious messenger who did not reveal the commissioner's identity, and that Mozart came to believe that he was writing the requiem for his own funeral.

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